THE AFGHAN JEWELRY SCHOOL

Posted on Posted in FUTURE BRILLIANCE, INDIA, Inspirations, Jewelry

On Monday morning, we hit the ground running. The accountant, Chris, from London arrives on the first flight via Delhi so over breakfast and coffee we discuss the short-term and long-term budget of the project with regard to trade shows and trunk shows for Annie’s and my collections. We also shared which shows we thought would be a good fit and how Fragments would enhance this information. It will be very interesting to have Fragments’ input as they have both a wholesale and retail jewelry business in all price points and will understand where and how these collections will fit. Ben Thelan, the media-man who is filming the unfolding of the Future Brilliance Project was also present.

The quite wonderful thing about meetings in Jaipur is that they are held in a marvelous old hotel. Its where we stayed the first few nights.

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(the dining room)

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(Ben and Annie researching show dates)

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(Sophia creating spreadsheets)

After the meeting, we packed up in the minivan with our driver, Sambhur, whose face was uncannily familiar. It wasn’t just his face; Sambhur is like an old-school gracious gentleman. He is impeccably groomed, pressed, reserved and his minimal head-nods and hand gestures are elegant. Think tuxedos and high-polished shoes. Well, no wonder. As we settle ourselves into the minivan, Sophia proclaims, ‘Doesn’t Sambhur look like Clark Gable?’ Take a look for yourself:

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We then head to lunch at the Legendary Restaurant where we tuck down some dal (yellow lentil curry) and take a short jaunt to the school to reconvene with the Afghan students. We did not know their skill level, their work methods or anything else. Like all else on this trip,Annie and I are happily surprised. The students are further on than we thought. Some are highly, highly skilled.

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(Sophia entering the stone cutting workshop.)

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(The gem-cutting classroom.)

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(A drawing showing facets on a round stone. The all-pink is the template for the underneath of a stone; the one on the right shows the facets for the top of a stone.)

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(The stone-setting and metal-cutting classroom.)

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(Some finished products.)

One thought on “THE AFGHAN JEWELRY SCHOOL

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